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Leading as a Practice Scholar

Leading as a Practice Scholar

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Leading as a Practice Scholar

Establishing Personal Credibility as a Leader and Modeling the Way for Others

As much as building personal credibility as a nursing leader is highly considered a challenging affair, any leader must strive to model the way for others. Firstly, a leader must be willing to listen to team members’ concerns before attempting to provide relevant instructions and pieces of advice (Heinen, et al., 2019). At the same time, he or she needs to be responsible for the actions of his or her team by embracing the failures and mistakes (Heinen et al., 2019). Hence, establishing personal credibility requires the nursing leader to address all emerging issues with caution, honesty, and a high level of consistency that would plausibly encourage collaboration. Equally, nursing leaders need to encourage their team members to express their doubts or suggestions without fear or favor (Heinen et al., 2019). Therefore, this action helps affirm the derived professional values and further engage them in shared aspirations.

Inspiring and Leading a Shared Vision into Reality

Leaders have to inspire a shared vision among their teams that would plausibly lead to reality by applying certain strategies. For example, they need to talk passionately about the future trends and relate to how they would affect their actions (Heinen et al., 2019). Likewise, they need to outline a compelling plan for the future and the way the team members would benefit from it. Further, they must break the goal into objectives to make the process appealing and exciting so that members have the needed motivation to stick to the plan (Heinen et al., 2019). Equally, leaders must describe how they would realize their long-term interests and inform them how to align the interests with the shared vision (Heinen et al., 2019). Lastly, leaders should devise a way of speaking with much conviction that brings a high meaning to the purpose of the shared vision.

Challenging the Current Process to Lead Change and Recognizing Others’ Contributions

Challenging a current process for a change necessitates a leader to evaluate a nursing organizational design and, therefore, mark out all the witnessed weaknesses. In this regard, transformational exercise would activate change management and help manipulate the narrative (Dalpiaz & Di Stefano, 2018). Furthermore, I would communicate the whole change management process transparently so that every member has complete information about the plan and  create a roadmap that would guide the team towards the common objective. For example, training and workshops would help members learn and understand the missed skill sets that are relevant for influencing a change (Bourn, 2018). Equally, coaching would help develop particular talents that match perfectly with the defined tasks and duties. Correspondingly, I would invite members to participate collaboratively to realize their potential towards a better decision-making process. Therefore, all these change management strategies assist in guiding the team towards the shared vision and its realization. Apart from that aspect, recognizing the contributions of my team members need to be as timely as possible so that they feel my appreciation is right-sized and sincere. As I see it, personalizing a member’s inputs sends the right message to the whole team, inspires, and motivates the team to excel in their efforts.

References

Bourn, D. (2018). Understanding global skills for 21st century professions. Springer.

Dalpiaz, E., & Di Stefano, G. (2018). A universe of stories: Mobilizing narrative practices during transformative change. Strategic Management Journal, 39(3), 664-696. https://doi.org/10.1002/smj.2730

Heinen, M., van Oosteven, C., Peters, J., Vermeulen, H., & Huis, A. (2019). An integrative review of leadership competencies and attributes in advanced nursing practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 75(11), 2378–2392. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14092

Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus That Plays God

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Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus That Plays God

Frankenstein, a novel by Marry Shelley, follows the story of a committed science student Victor Frankenstein, obsessed with finding the cause of life and giving life to lifeless objects. He makes a human being from body parts although it turns out terrible, evil, and murderous. These outcomes evoke regrets and guilt that psychologically torture Frankenstein, punishing him for opposing nature. The mythological Prometheus was punished for stealing fire and giving it to humans, which reflects the nature of Victor Frankenstein, who not only plays God but also uses his knowledge to create something new that did not exist before.

The “Modern Prometheus” illustrates Frankenstein’s actions, using the knowledge of science as a mythological Prometheus who utilized spiritual gifts to give life to the inanimate. According to the Greek and Roman mythology, Prometheus is associated with the creation of man, stealing fire, a symbolic representation of knowledge, from the heavens to ensure that a human is provided with warmth and enabled to live comfortably (Richard 295-297; Sasani and Pilevar 214). Although Prometheus ensures that the life of men he created is improved, he executes his intention against the will of Zeus, the God. As such, Prometheus is severely punished by being chained on a rock, and crying, “…crag at the edge of the world…” (Shelly 1) and “…behold me, an ill-fated god, chained, the foe of Zeus…because of my very great love of mankind…” (Shelly 33). Thus, in this context, the same situation faces Frankenstein hence regarded as the “Modern Prometheus” by Mary Shelly.

Frankenstein is referred to as the “Modern Prometheus” because he opposes nature to reinvent ideas into modern technology and science. His persistence in adventure ignites suffering for humanity (Richard 298). Similarly, Prometheus infuriated Zeus to create a Pandora’s Box, which was given to him with instructions not to open it (Shelly 36). Out of curiosity and defiance against Zeus’ commands, Prometheus opened it, thereby releasing all illness, disasters, and evil to the human generation to suffer (Richard 295; Crook et al. 94). Frankenstein lived with guilt, regretting having made a “monster” and releasing it into society, causing the death of many of his family and friends. However, Frankenstein’s was subjected to psychological alienation (Shelly 43), unlike Prometheus, whom the Gods punished not only psychologically but also physically. Probably, Shelly wanted to indicate that the gods controlled everything in ancient times, including being responsible for all that happened to humanity. Therefore, the “Modern Prometheus” is in control of his life, including his damnation.

Equally, Frankenstein sought to play God by being responsible for giving life to inanimate objects. It was the greatest ambition of his life. He was motivated by the urge to be worshipped and blessed by his creatures: “a new species will bless me as its creator and source” (Sasani and Pilevar 214). Ironically, however, he ignored the actual relationship with the people that loved him dearly. Along the way, he grew immersed in sorrow than love: “I seemed to have lost all soul or sensation but for this pursuit” (Shelly 45). The regret grows when he is with friends who have no desire to alter humanity to something unnatural (45). After realizing his creation, Frankenstein immediately begins expressing contempt for the creatures he made, “I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open…” (Shelly 42). “How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe…” (Shelly 42), and he starts describing the emotion; “His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of lustrous black…” (Shelly 4). The same situation occurred to Prometheus, who expressed pride in his creation and thus, felt satisfied with his work.

However, their decisions to go against the natural laws eventually resulted in regret and devastation. Frankenstein became a broken man, which symbolizes concerns of Shelly’s on the effects of defying scientific methods (Richard 297). Although Prometheus and Frankenstein’s actions were out of goodwill, they implemented partisan blessings. Like in Frankenstein’s case, fire is used as symbolism for both evil and good deeds. Correspondingly, the ability of Frankenstein to give life yields to evil, as witnessed in the daemon’s destructive deeds (Sasani and Pilevar 214). Thus, the same destruction is shown in his selfish and cold treatment given to his creations.

Frankenstein as the “Modern Prometheus” highlights the role of women in modern society. Notably, Prometheus is considered the creator of humanity amongst Greeks and Roman mythologies (Crook et al. 96-101). However, he is not directly associated with creating women. Instead, it was an act advanced by god Zeus to punish Prometheus for exhibiting strong love for creating man (Crook et al. 98-101). Interestingly, the story’s unfolding emphasizes that women were created to punish but not for companionship or joy according to ancient mythologies. Hence, Prometheus is depicting women negatively.

Frankenstein’s love and relationship life with friends and family are characterized by unfortunate encounters. In the mythological Prometheus, the story lacks any mortal female except the beautiful but highly troublesome Pandora, who is created later. Thus, the Prometheus myth directly alludes to Frankenstein’s story where all women encounter untimely death (92). For instance, Frankenstein’s mother dies before his daemon is animated, while Elizabeth becomes an orphan when her mother dies at childbirth. Likewise, a young nurse, Justine, is wrongfully convicted and sentenced to death (97). Therefore, the misfortunes that befell women in the story sustain the suffering women undergo because of perception from modern society.

Frankenstein immediately feels guilty and remorseful of his adventures, which have eventually become destructive. The daemon is destined to remain motherless and entirely without a partner. All women around him are ill-fated. Thus, Shelly could have intentionally created this situation to illustrate women’s critical roles in society (Crook et al. 103). Equally, it served as a demonstration of the absence of a strong female personality in her life and a clear sense of abandonment (Berger 146). These suggestions are highlighted in Frankenstein’s dream after creating a monster. Frankenstein explains this through his encounter with Elizabeth, who turns into a corpse while kissing her (Sasaniand Pilevar, 214). Therefore, the lack of male-female solid relationship encounters in the story is the real-life encounters in the modern social setting.

Through the Frankenstein story, Shelly passes a precautionary message to modern humanity about the consequences of usurping divine power. She alludes to the classical Prometheus myth that demonstrates the activities of Frankenstein with the basic human aspirations and desires. Whenever humankind attempts to transcend beyond the natural limits, there is the potential of overdoing that ultimately causes irreversible harm against humanity. Thus, Frankenstein’s story should be understood from the mythological perspective as it will enhance understanding besides explaining the reality that goes beyond generations.

Works Cited

Berger, Arthur A. “Frankenstein: The New Prometheus.” Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts, Vol. 2. SAGE Publications, Inc., 1992, pp. 147-56, dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483325316.n11. Accessed 18 June 2021.

Crook, Nora, and Betty T. Bennett. “Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus.” The Novels and Selected Works of Mary Shelley, 2020, pp. 1-173, doi.org/10.4324/9780429350030. Accessed 18 June 2021.

Richard, Jennifer. “A Paradise of My Own Creation”: Frankenstein and the Improbable Romance of Polar Exploration, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, vol. 25, no.4, 2003, pp. 295-314, doi:10.1080/0890549032000167826. Accessed June 2021.

Sasani, Samira, and Hamidreza Pilevar. “Modern Prometheus: Marry Shelley’s Frankenstein and Rejection of Romanticism.” International Journal of Applied Linguistics and English Literature, vol. 6, no. 2, 2017, p. 214, www.academia.edu/29357759/No_Romantic_Prometheus_Marry_Shelleys_Frankenstein_and_Rejection_of_Romanticism. Accessed 18 June 2021.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. 2nd ed., edited by J. Paul Hunter, W.W. Norton & Co., 2012, www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/frankenstein-second-edition-norton-critical-editions. Accessed 18 June 2021.

Status Characteristic Is a Barrier for Power, Influence, and Diversity in Organizations

Status Characteristic Is a Barrier for Power, Influence, and Diversity in Organizations

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Status Characteristic Is a Barrier for Power, Influence, and Diversity in Organizations

I concur with my classmate’s sentiments that military symbol of status would affect one’s individual value or credit in an organization. As much as it is important to cordon individuals with rank, duty position, and accouterments, these military symbols sustain a negative bearing on one’s personal value (Murray, 2019). For example, a military cordoned in uniform rank might not take directions from his or her perceived superiors who are not formally in higher status ranks. Although my classmate feels leadership should inspire influence in organizations, it does not always work because diversity in military organizations is dictated by the ability of a person to rise above his or her personal accreditations and further exercise power through the symbol of status (Murray, 2019). Consequently, I feel the need to institutionalize military organizations to limit the uniform status from superseding one’s individual value.

In contrast, I agree that gender is a diffuse characteristic in power and influence because it illustrates one’s expected performance in respect to situations. Particularly, studies recurrently demonstrate that gender acts as a status characteristic when women in organizations are expected to perform lesser tasks and duties in comparison with their male counterparts (Lucas & Baxter, 2012). Likewise, my classmate’s comment that women would receive lower assessments for their work performances than men do in spite of the involved objective merit of such measures is relatively correct. Most individuals in charge of work evaluation in organizations regard female leadership occupants as illegitimate. Indeed, this attitude might be associated with misogynist and chauvinistic perception of the society. Therefore, such non-conscious biases seemingly deter many women from exercising their power, influence, and diversity in organizations (Lucas & Baxter, 2012). Thus, these biases would limit advancement in many organizations today.

References

Lucas, W. W., & Baxter, R. A. (2012). Power, influence, and diversity in organizations. ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 639(1), 49-70. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002716211420231

Murray, M. (2019). The struggle for recognition in international relations: Status, revisionism, and rising powers. Oxford University Press.

Discussion Essay on Chinese Films

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Discussion Essay on Chinese Films

A Chinese Ghost Story and In the Mood for Love

In the film A Chinese Ghost Story by Yan Gaan Do, the director gives a positive impression of the used accessory’s visual effects while featuring a lack of the magical feeling of nostalgia in its theme. In contrast, in the film In the Mood for Love by Wong Kar-Wai, the director successfully manages to create an atmosphere of nostalgia that resonates well with the audience’s expectations. However, as the movie creates an illusion of love permanency, the derived impression is intuitively sensational. Therefore, A Chinese Ghost Story and In the Mood for Love differ completely in achieving nostalgia among their audiences.

            The most exciting and provocative part of the film In the Mood for Love is a cultural intersection where Chow Mo-wan tells a friend how the people in the past kept secrets by drilling holes on trees and covering them with mud. It is provocative how Ah Ping shows her intention to make love with her friend, Mo-wan, as a sign of keeping secrets.

            Assessment of characters via analysis of their interactions helps understand their motives. In the reading, Andrew Yue records the meeting point of two neighbors intersected by the themes of the sanctity of marriage and restraint of affair (124). As they spend time together, they realize that love seems to draw them closer to each other. The story is pegged on the intersection of three regions while providing historic parallelism on how two diverse sets of generational eras used to keep secrets. Consequently, Yue offers a clear comprehension of the film In the Mood for Love and the way societies have misconceived love in extra-marital affairs. For example, a party in a married couple would feel inclined to fall in love with another person in case he or she experiences a feeling of being cheated on by a lover (Yue 126). The perceived love arrangement is subjective on coincidences rather than objective on wish and desire. While reading Love in Ruins by Olivia Khoo, one understands that the film In the Mood for Love is coincidentally subjective in the sense that it fails to meet the intended objective (259). Love cannot involve qualities of intersection and coincidence even though it might appear so. Therefore, love usually results from a desire, wish, or frustration to know more than a gaze of the eye. The love featured in the In the Mood for Love cannot seem coincidental since the healthy stage-managed spouses of the characters are not seen but rather choreographed to bring an intersection.

Farewell China and Chungking Express

The film Farewell China by Clara Law conveys an impression of universality that resonates appropriately with the audience on how an actual love story seems profoundly moving. The story’s meaningful truths are more culturally and personally specific, especially by a succinct illustration of the family amidst a crisis. In contrast, director Wong Kar-Wai creates a lasting poetic impression in Chungking Express and captivates the audiences with its softly arousing kinetic effects that embellish via its tale of romance. Whereas the film Farewell China offers a perception of the changing landscape of Chinese cultures and styles due to the need to merge with the American trends, Chungking Express differs slightly  and signifies the shift in one’s routines after a relationship breakup. Both films imply parting ways with previously held onto ties.

            The most exciting scenes in the film Chungking Express entail how the passive observation of Faye Wong, an employee at the Midnight food express, shifts to curiosity. She develops mad interests in the breakup affairs of the two cops who frequently visit the food mart. Thus, the provocative aspect of this scene is a parallel ground of the same situation that haunts two police officers, compels Wong to have a turning point in life. At first, she was interested in underworld revenge, but then her attention shifts to love.

            The reading on Chungking Express by David Desser underscores how the popularity of film director Wong Kar-Wai has reached transnational borders, especially in Hollywood. The director was formerly unknown to many international audiences. However, his production that focused majorly on the Chinese culture has earned him a high credit of reputation due to the existence of an artisanal style of filmmaking (Desser 320). Besides, the reading by Yiman Wang illustrates how the Chinese films have reconfigured their artisanal style to fit in the international media capitals. Wang’s discussions revolve around the features that make Chinese films more Chinese in style and art. Moreover, he offers reasons that make these films gain international exhibition and reception (Wang 164). Therefore, these two readings positively bear on the film Chungking Express since it offers a series of guidelines on how a production director would make their films attain international exhibition in the United States. The readings stress the need to re-recognizing the Chinese film industry towards artisanal filmmaking features. Consequently, these features cause Chinese movies to gain broad, foreign audiences.

Works Cited

A Chinese Ghost Story. Directed by Ching Siu-tung, Golden Suns Film, 1987. 

Chungking Express. Directed by Wong Kar-wai, 1994.

Desser, David. “Chungking Express, Tarantino, and the Making of a Reputation.” A Companion to Wong Kar-Wai, pp. 319-44.

Farewell China. Directed by Lulu Wang, Golden Suns Film, 1990.

In the Mood for Love. Directed by Wong Kar-wai, 2000.

Khoo, Olivia. “Love in Ruins: Spectral Bodies in Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love.”Embodied Modernities, pp. 235-52.

Wang, Yiman. “Made in China, Sold in the United States, and Vice Versa – Transnational ‘Chinese’ Cinema between Media Capitals.” Journal of Chinese Cinemas, vol. 3, no. 2, 2009, pp. 163-76.

Yue, Andrey. “In the Mood for Love: Intersections of Hong Kong Modernity.” China Films in Focus II, pp. 121-26.

XP 18

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XP 18

Given the equation

Question 1

Using your calculator/technology to help, sketch the graph of this function on a set of Polar axes over the interval [0, 2Pi].  Mark the orientation of the graph; mark the intercepts and identify them with their Polar coordinates. Also, identify the angle in this interval for which r is undefined.

Polar plot =>

Polar Plots

https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP437914990h21488836ib00000hieg6dbf92g80b2?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=43&w=430.&h=71.&cdf=Animation
https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP438214990h21488836ib000062gc09cc06721eie?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=43&w=430.&h=164.&cdf=Animation
https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP438514990h21488836ib000049gi80ghb79i5f87?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=43&w=430.&h=289.&cdf=Animation
https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP438814990h21488836ib00003a9c8f4ifi1ffe6i?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=43&w=430.&h=360.&cdf=Animation

Question 2

A). Let R be the region swept out by r over the theta-interval, where.   Set up the Polar-form integral whose value represents the Area of R. 

Integration; definite integral

 integral_0^pi 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (32 pi)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2

Series expansion at k=0

Indefinite integral

 integral 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (32 x)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2 + constant

B). Use the formula

                                                                        (CRC Handbook, #366)

            to help write another formula, using variable k, that would represent the Area of    region R, as defined in part A.

New formula;

Thus,

 integral 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (32 x)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2 + constant

C). Use your formula from part B to find the Area of R when k =

            I)                                     II)                                    III)     

Make small sketches illustrating what R looks like in each case; report the areas rounded to the nearest tenth.

At k =π/4 area bound is;

 integral_0^(pi\/4) 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (8 pi)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2

  however, π= 3.14 and k = π/4

Area =  = 25.10

https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP1176171c8b93691806f000000d21aa34bd3dc5a2?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=10&w=407.&h=176.

Figure 1: Sketch varying k from 0 to π/4

At k =π/2 area bound is;

 integral_0^(pi\/2) 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (16 pi)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2

  however, π= 3.14 and k = π/2

Area =  = 54.20

https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP12131afc26d77dhg8di400002ef3cc9g41gbai86?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=33&w=407.&h=176.

Figure 2: Sketch varying k from 0 to π/2

At k =3π/4 area bound is;

 integral_0^((3 pi)\/4) 1\/2 (8\/(1 + cos(k)))^2 dx = (24 pi)\/(cos(k) + 1)^2

  however, π= 3.14 and k = 3π/4

Area =  = 75.43

https://www4f.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP204417h4f85b79fafd2b00001510d878f4b87ch0?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=44&w=407.&h=178.

Figure 3:Sketch varying k from 0 to 3π/4

Assessing Your Non-Verbal and Listening Communication Skills

Assessing Your Non-Verbal and Listening Communication Skills

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Assessing Your Non-Verbal and Listening Communication Skills

            Regarding relational listening, analytic listening, task listening, and critical listening, my scores are 15, 18, 27, and 17, respectively. However, my younger sister’s scores are 20, 22, 20, and 27 regarding the enlisted order of listening skills. In contrast, the score on my non-verbal communication cues is 12, whereas my younger sister’s score is 19 for the six listed items. 

            While relational listening skills of my younger sister and me have few similarities, we exhibit numerous differences in the other three listening-type skills. For example, my sister and I demonstrate a lower score on relational listening than average because we rarely attempt to establish a rapport with a speaker. Instead, we tend to focus centrally on their thoughts and ideas. On the contrary, we express divergent views on the task and critical listening skills (Listening, 2021). While my sister does not concentrate on thoughts and ideas, I would not mind having speakers taking too long to embark on their agendas and I prefer speakers who rush to the main ideas. My desire to have speakers jump to main ideas has occasionally clouded my ability to spot inconsistencies in their talks. This approach reflects the lack of relation between the beginning and the end in a logical way since the listener prefers the speaker not to show the entire process of reasoning (Weerasinghe & Thisera, 2015). Therefore, I would not notice any contradictions in a speaker’s topics as much as my sister would do. I think that my sister manages to monitor closely for any inconsistencies and contradictions in a speaker’s talk because she pays more attention to a person’s non-verbal communication cues than I do. Although I have strength in maintaining eye contact with a speaker to help me comprehend the discussed points, I do not have positive skills in relational listening. I only listen to understand the ideas or offer my critiques concerning the matter of discussion. In this regard, most speakers would not prefer to bond with me because I ask them many critical questions.

            To be an effective communicator, I need to start learning both the relational and task listening skills to reinforce my limiting non-verbal cues. Firstly, I would have to unlearn my stressful critique approach of talking to speakers. By becoming more engaging and accepting, a listener can benefit from the communication (Bucata & Rizescu, 2017). I believe that such prefaces would help me establish a better rapport with speakers, improving my ability to listen attentively. Likewise, I would have to focus less on the speaker’s errors and instead concentrate on the mood and tone. Understanding the circumstances surrounding speakers without prejudging them on their sentiments is a critical element of communication (MasterClass, 2020). Besides, setting this practical communication goal would fruitfully assist me at school, home, and my future workplace. As I take time to listen keenly to my family members, it would help foster confidence and trust in our conversation. Therefore, many friends at school would get confident to have an open talk since I would have learned to give them ample space to express their ideas freely. Indeed, I have realized that avoiding all kinds of distractions and remaining focused throughout a talk would help me demonstrate consistent body language. Hence, it would lead to an adequate bonding with speakers.

References

Bucata, G., & Rizescu, A. M. (2017). The role of communication in enhancing the work effectiveness of an organization. Land Forces Academy Review, 22(1), 1-56. https://www.doi:10.1515/raft-2017-0008.

Listening. (2021, September 12). Listening outcomes. https://sites.google.com/austincc.edu/interpersonaloer/unit-7-listening/module-2-listening-types-and-habits

MasterClass. (2020, November 8). 7 types of listening: How listening styles help you communicate. https://www.masterclass.com/articles/how-listening-styles-help-you-communicate

Weerasinghe, D. T., & Thisera, R. T. (2015). Keys to effective listening and presenting: An action plan. Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management, 9(1-2), 33. https://www.doi:10.4038/kjhrm.v9i1-2.11.

Health Care Initiatives for a Communication Plan

Health Care Initiatives for a Communication Plan

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Health Care Initiatives for a Communication Plan

Steps for Creating anInternal Communication Strategy

  1. Gauging the present communication strategy with an intention to redefine its inconsistencies (WHO, 2017).
  2. Recognizing the key health care metrics in a bid to track and study the success path.
  3. Establishing the most realistic goals coupled with coinciding timelines for attaining the desired outcomes.
  4. Segmenting the right audience with an intention to create a positive synchronization of tasks among the health care practitioners.
  5. Building a professional relationship among the entire staff that would impact the approval process effectively.
  6. Evaluating the progress of the set health care initiatives and further optimize the whole process(WHO, 2017).

Steps for Creating anExternal Communication Strategy

  1. Creating and developing external communication initiatives is the first step (WHO, 2017).
  2. Refining the image of the health care setting is critically done by reviewing the promotion strategy.
  3. Building a robust professional relationship between the health care setting and the outside environment.
  4. Assessing the methods of inviting the health care’s stakeholders and partners to get involved in the planning of the communication strategy (WHO, 2017).
  5. Selecting strategic approaches is important as one intends to assess the positioning of the health care initiatives.

Potential Impact of the Implementation of the Health Care Initiatives Strategic Plan

The implementation of health care initiatives impacts the communicant plan positively by outlining and developing a value advantage across the system (ImplementAll, 2017). Additionally, it helps create a meaningful differentiation of the entire communication plan, thus sustaining the operations of the health care setup. Ideally, creating a better communication plan in a health care setting is a promising recipe for allocating and aligning resources relevant for advancing the professional functions of all the staff team (WHO, 2017). Besides, the execution of health care initiatives influence the need for developing an understanding, insight, and commitment, leading to high accountability among the professional practitioners. In fact, an effective health care initiative strategic plan would provide a sense of direction, and further outline a measurable goal (ImplementAll, 2017). Therefore, these strategic planning tools are useful for supervisory day-day decisions, thus evaluating the shifting approaches of a health care system.

References

ImplementAll. (2017). Communication plan. Towards Evidence-Based Tailored Implementation Strategies for eHealth, 7(2), 1-66. doi:122356/derr.

World Health Organization (WHO). (2017). WHO strategic communications framework for effective communications. Goals and Audiences, 1-56.

Health Benefits of Probiotics

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Health Benefits of Probiotics

With the recent rise in research on probiotics, significant advances in the selection and classification of specific probiotic cultures are coupled with considerable health benefits concerning consumption. An ecological thought of the intestinal flora is necessary for the understanding of the relevance of probiotic food concept relevance in respect to human health. Therefore, every person has a distinctive signature of approximately1,000 microbial species inside the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

The beneficial usage of intestinal microflora is colonization resistance. It is a “barrier effect” used by indigenous gut bacteria to maintain the existence of probiotics and further provide niche protection against freshly ingested microbes, such as pathogens (Kechagia et al. 1). Particularly, the intestinal microflora is manipulated to increase its capacity to contain numerous “beneficial bacteria” that affect immune function, metabolism, brain-gut communication, and digestion effectively (Kechagia et al. 2). Probiotics enhance the host microflora and help deter the entrance of pathogens. Additionally, they are recognized to sustain promising outcomes, including enriched gut barrier function, improved ability to contest with pathogenic micro-biota regarding the adhesion to the gut, and developed colonization resistance (Kechagia et al. 3). The benefits of using probiotics are proven scientifically with the rapid increase in their popularity.

Probiotics stimulate, modulate, and regulate the host’s immune response, thus initiating the activation of detailed genes of localized cells. The modulation of the gastrointestinal hormone would trigger the release and regulation of brain behavior via bidirectional neuronal signaling (Kechagia et al. 4). All these functions are a part of the gut-brain axis. Moreover, probiotics continuously induce the intestinal angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), which controls both acute and chronic inflammation inside the intestinal mucosal tissue (Kechagia et al. 5). Consequently, they trigger biological functions that significantly enhance the health of the host environment while calibrating the useful microbes for curbing overweight as well as obesity.

Work Cited

Kechagia, Maria, et al. “Health Benefits of Probiotics: A Review.” ISRN Nutrition, vol. 5, no, 1, 2013, pp. 1-5. doi:10.5402/2013/481651.

The Panama Canal

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The Panama Canal

A canal refers to an artificially built passage to allow the movement of water vessels. The link https://www.sil.si.edu/Exhibitions/Make-the-Dirt-Fly/ offers a reading on the history of the construction the Panama Canal as a linkage between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The four introductory photos used in the reading include “Why Build a Canal?” “Choosing a Route,” “Waging War on Mosquitoes,” and “Life in the Canal Zone.” These photos provide some historical descriptions of the events and occurrences during the development of the Panama Canal. Thus, the subsequent discussions describe different sections and photos as observed from the reading.

Why Build a Canal? Many factors played a part in instigating the need to build the canal, including commercial, military, and national values. However, the idea of building the Panama Canal emerged in the 16th century from the Spanish explorer Vasco Nunez de Balboa. According to Balboa, the Isthmus of Panama was as a bridge that separated the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The discovery ignited the need to establish a natural waterway that could enable movement across the two oceans. However, no attempts were made to realize this vision until the nineteenth century. The Western world was put in motion following transportation, communications, and machinery facilities in this period. People and finished commodities needed to be moved to distant markets. However, it was challenging to find the shortest route. Inter-oceanic and rail transport were expensive and time-consuming. Besides commercial importance, canals were viewed as a source of military and national significance. For instance, the Isthmian Canal reflected the glory of France, whereas Americans wanted to control the canal to dominate the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Therefore, the existence of isthmuses, including Panama, remained a hindrance in achieving these objectives.

Choosing A Route. Before the construction process began, there were mainly two different choices for the appropriate route. Initially, Americans viewed that the appropriate route linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans was Nicaragua but not the Panama one. However, this view changed, especially following the involvement of experienced French engineer Phillippe-Jean Bunau-Varilla. He lobbied the American lawmakers to consider buying the assets of the French canal in Panama. Equally, he convinced most of them about the dangers that the Nicaragua canal posed mainly because of the frequent volcanoes in the area. Thus, in the 19th century, Americans began the purchase of French assets in Panama.

            The purchase process faced resistance from Colombia that was a part of Panama. However, a consensus was reached between Panama and French government through a treaty initiated by John Hay and Bunau-Varilla, which allowed the progress of the project under the control of Americans. Thus, the route was constructed by Americans, opening a waterway link between the two oceans.

Waging War on Mosquitoes. Over 24,000 workers of the Panama Canal died during the period of construction. The canal construction encountered different challenges; for example, the weather condition, challenging terrains, and effects of tropical diseases were a great obstacle. The earlier French constructors lost about twenty thousand workers. A similar situation happened with Americans, who lost about five thousand and six hundred workers from tropical diseases. Most deaths were attributed to yellow fever and malaria sickness. Interestingly, it was difficult to establish actual cause of these diseases since most medical experts thought it was caused by poor hygienic conditions. No one understood that the mosquitoes were the primary carriers. Later, in the 20th century, some medical experts realized that mosquitoes were the carrier agents. Hence, this discovery made it easy to control the disease, thereby significantly reducing its impacts. Some measures employed were improved sanitation that involved draining standing waters, eliminating potential breeding grounds, and using window screens on buildings. Therefore, this strategy significantly reduced the number of deaths during the project.

Life in the Canal Zone. Different situations predicted the life in the canal during the period of construction that focused on the work that ran from Monday to Sunday with ten hours of activity per day. Other situations included periods of equipment repairing and learning sessions. However, the success of the project was based on three factors: stability, the health of workers, and their satisfaction. The workers were awarded generous pay packages and accessible accommodation to ensure that they remain comfortable and energized to provide their service. Equally, feeding services were provided at subsidized costs for motivation. Therefore, these programs served as significant factors to have workers remain committed to the course.

            Lastly, information sharing was encouraged through the Canal Record as the official newspaper for the Commission. It was published weekly with the main content, highlighting the workers’ social life in the canal zone, sports, and amusements, among other activities. Some popular topics, such as excavation records, contributed to competitions among different excavation methods. However, this competition was healthy because it motivated the discovery of other easy and highly efficient methods. Therefore, besides the project’s challenges, it was both an adventurous and constructive endeavor towards a new economic and political development era.

Inquiring Minds Want to Know Now

Inquiring Minds Want to Know Now

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Institutional Affiliation

Inquiring Minds Want to Know Now

Building the Hierarchy of the Management-Research Question

  1. Has the number of leads generated by business publication adverting reduced as compared to the past?
  2. Has the reduced number of leads been contributed by a lack of tracking of the source of the lead among many companies?
  3. Could the unattractive lead source occasion lower advertising revenues if other alternate methods of inquiry are not utilized?

Study’s Ethical Issues

Reader-targeted mail questionnaire by phone would infringe on the consent rights of more than 1.7 million users as only 300 individuals had initially subscribed to receiving e-mail warnings from IndustryWeekly (Schindler, 2013). 

Sampling Plan

The sample’s construction entailed stratified disproportionate random sampling with subscribers who belong to one of 42 cells (Schindler, 2013). A stratified disproportionate random sample provides a greater accuracy as it frequentlycomprises a smaller sample that cuts down onthe incurred costs (Lynn, 2016). On the other hand, disproportionate stratified sampling is disadvantageous because it requires extra administrative effort, leading tocomputationally challenging analysis.

Research Design

The research design entailed seven industry groups by six job titles that totaled 710 completed survey questionnaires. Strengths of descriptive survey research design include cost-effectiveness,versatility, andreliability (Lynn, 2016). Indeed, it is cost-effective to receive responses from the target samples. Moreover, the received responses are considered reliable and versatile because the target samples answer the questionnaires accurately. On the contrary, the inherent weaknesses of this research design type are inflexible responses, which lack the potential depth of the expressed sentiments (Lynn, 2016).

Critique of the Study Survey

Since the survey study happened via mail, the targeted sampling size would be negligible. Moreover, from the report, the comprehensive samples would not answer the questionnaires as fewer individuals provide their e-mail addresses on the Internet for fear of hacking.

Preparing the Survey for Analysis

With the construction of the survey sample through the use of the stratified disproportionate random sampling, the targeted subscribers were presumably classified under one of 42 cells (Schindler, 2013). Thus, the active seven industry groups by six job titles totaled the completed questionnaires to 710 respondents. However, the survey analysis starts with only 676 individuals who previously purchased the advertising publication products (Schindler, 2013).

Partly, the study is set up for tabulation by considering that out of 676 respondents, only 97.7% had contacted an advertiser during the past year (Schindler, 2013). Therefore, the analysis of the study would involve the use of SPSS since it would measure complex data of multiple variables like the made inquiries by web visits, fax-on-demand, or e-mail at 49.1% (Schindler, 2013). Thus, the statistical software helped factor in other sub-variables inside the three listed methods of receiving inquiries.

Compiling Report for Decision-Making by IndustryWeekly’s Managers

With more than 71.4% of the respondents having mailed a reader service card in the past year for a non-immediate need and 69.3% having done the same for a business reply card to an advertiser, the publishing of reader service cards would not generate more revenues for the publicationadvertising company.

Compiling Report for the Limitations of the Study

            The study was deemed to fail in defending its findings since the need for the quick response regarding product availability and delivery are regularly affected by the time pressures of the downsizing workforce and costs considerations.

Recommending Further Actions on the Publication of Reader Service Cards

With the decreasing value of the reader response card in response to subscribers, the idea of publishing cards would matteras the behavior of respondents over the Internet has varied based on the immediacy of objective (Schindler, 2013). Therefore, buyers would prefer telephone contact over e-mail service, especially when they need immediate product info. Therefore, I would suggest that IndustryWeekly implement the auto-web gathering responses on the users’ choice methods for contacting the company.

References

Lynn, P. (2016). The advantage and disadvantage of implicitly stratified sampling. Understanding Society Series Paper, 5, 1-19.

Schindler, P. (2013). Business Research Methods (13th ed.). McGraw Hill.